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The Martian - Part II - Adventure on the Rust Planet

The Rust Planet - Mars

The movie, in 3D, was visually stunning  and the extra dimension added layers to the CGI of Mars. I was so immersed that I only noticed the 3D at certain heightened moments, one in particular when snow was falling in front of onlookers on earth. I was fully engrossed.  

Galvanic Corrosion: It's In Your Electronics

Corrosion on metals

Galvanic corrosion is a type of corrosion which occurs when two different metals are in contact with each other and an electrolyte.  Different metals will have different electric potentials when connected in this way.  This difference creates an electric current through the electrolyte.  In fact, the action of galvanic corrosion is the principle with which batteries are made.  Of course this is also the reason batteries have a shelf life.  The action of this circuit degrades whichever metal has a lower electric potential.  This is described as being less noble, whereas the metal with the higher potential is more noble. The degradation of the less noble metal eventually gets to the point that the circuit is broken by the oxides and salts created by the corrosion.  This is the reason not only for a battery’s eventual death, but also for the way it dies, slowly losing electric potential because the anode (lower potential metal or connection) is slowly destroyed by the action of galvanic corrosion.

Adventure on the Rust Planet: The Martian

Mars Rust Planet The Martian

I'm very excited about the movie The Martian. Clearly I am not alone; after its opening day it received high audience ratings and near-to-box-office-record receipts. Although that may be because of the self-selected group anticipating to see it on opening day, let me give you a few reasons why you should be excited too.

Electronics Corrosion

Intercept Packaging can prevent corrosion in electronics

To be clear, the difference between electronics and other electrical systems is that electronics include active components to control the flow of electricity, whereas non-electronic electrical systems use mechanical switches or relays.  The development of the vacuum tube (the first active component invented) allowed for the creation of far more complex systems than was possible with prior technology.  Then solid-state transistors allowed electronics to shrink to sizes unthinkable before. Certainly at this point it is trivial to say that electronics are ubiquitous in society today and will only continue to become more so in the coming years, all the way up to the singularity, at which point we will become our own technology.  As electronics have developed through the years, they have been given increasingly more important tasks.  From air traffic control to car computers to medical equipment to missile defense, systems which include electronics control and protect our lives everyday.  Thus it is essential that we know how to maintain them, for which we must also know how they degrade.

Chlorine, Pitting Corrosion and Intercept

chlorine in elemental form as a green gas

Chlorine is one of the most common elements found on Earth's crust.  The name comes from the Greek word for light green, which is how the gas appears in elemental form.  It has 17 protons and two stable isotopes giving it a standard atomic weight of 35.45, which makes chlorine the second lightest halogen.  It also has the highest electron affinity of any element making it a very strong oxidizer.  This means that chlorine will readily steal electrons from other elements.  In fact the vast majority of chlorine found on Earth is in the form of the chloride anion (a chlorine atom which has already stolen an extra electron), which will form ionic compounds with many cations (like metals).  It is in this form that humans are most familiar with chlorine, as in ionic compound sodium chloride, which we know of as table salt.  The chloride ion is important to many chemical and industrial processes including the making of usable chlorine and sodium hydroxide, and desalination and testing of potable water.

Packaging Delight - Santa Claus Analysis

Santa Claus

My yearly tradition includes reading a physics approach to examining whether Santa Clause could exist and could actually deliver presents to children. This article was published in 1990 by Spy magazine. Since then, it has become the foundation for many chat room arguments about the possibility of Santa, and has been, as I understand it, cross checked and rebutted against by many. Its numerical approach to the circumstances necessary for Santa to do his work is delightful, as is its comically abrupt ending. The physics and analysis are all in good fun and they force adults to think about things differently and put themselves, albeit briefly, back into the shoes of children, to possibly think of magic as an explanation to what they are considering.  I know it works on me.

Corrosion on Guitar Strings and How to Solve with Packaging

View Intercept Video

We've had the good fortune to meet many engineers, managers, and business owners in all types of businesses, who are also musicians. I'm pleased to share my favorite Intercept Technology Packaging success story with this intriguing short video presented by Greg Spitz. If you're a musician, know anyone who is, or you just love music, you'll want to watch.... stringed instruments players, you may recognize the copper-colored bag shown in this video.

The Creative Content Guy

Greg Zapped

Perhaps you’ve noticed the increased quality and style in Liberty Packaging’s shared content over the last year. This improvement can be attributed to our newest creative and tech staffer, Greg Spitz.  Certainly, his last two videos “Corrosion - Its Natural” and “ESD and Static - Fun With Science” are unique and engaging.  Greg took on two very complex subjects which continue to be studied in great detail by generations of scientists, engineers, and other specialists. There are associations, companies such as Liberty Packaging, seminars, white papers, trade shows and other groups specifically geared to the study and management of corrosion and ESD.  Greg stepped back to view the big picture on these issues and simplified them for two three-minute videos that just make sense. We urge you to take a look.

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Corrosion or Rust? Expert John Murphy To the Rescue

View Intercept Video

When a man spends his entire career searching for the best ways to safely control quality in the industrial workplace, he earns the wisdom to be called an expert. John Murphy, Liberty Packaging’s Director of New Business, is a veritable fountain of knowledge regarding detergents, solvents, packaging materials, corrosion, quality in manufacturing and related topics.

Storage and Preservation for Coins: It Matters

Coin Armour Intercept Packaging

From guest poster, Chris Iannucci: When I first began collecting coins and other collectibles about 10 years ago, I never gave much thought to proper storage and preservation. I just bought what I liked, and kept most items in a display case so I could view them from time to time or share them with friends or family. This gave me much enjoyment over the years.  

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